Molough Abbey Co. Tipperary

The sleepy Augustinian Nunnery at Molough just outside of  Newcastle was a hive of activity today. A historical and archaeological  tour of the abbey  took place as part of the annual Éigse festival.

Talk at Molough Abbey, Newcastle

Talk at Molough Abbey, Newcastle

Despite the  rain a large crowd still turned out. Breda Ryan talked about the history of the nunnery and I gave a tour of the the site.

Carved doorway in south wall of  church at Molough Abbey

Carved doorway in south wall of church at Molough Abbey

The monastery was dedicated to St Brigid and was founded in the early medieval period by the daughters of the King of the Deise.  It appears to have been re-founded in the early part of the later medieval period. The present remains consist of a 13th century church, a cloister and two domestic buildings on the  east and west side of the cloister.

View of cloister on the north side of the church

View of cloister on the north side of the church

The church  has a number or single light sandstone windows and a beautiful  15th century carved limestone doorway.  There are traces of painted plaster work in the  east window of the south wall. The paint is orange/reddish colour with black horizontal lines which appears to trying to imitate ashlar masonry.

Section of painted plaster in the south-east window of church

Section of painted plaster in the south-east window of church

One comment on “Molough Abbey Co. Tipperary

  1. […] Thirteenth century masons marks then to be angular lines often  crossing lines. In Ireland by the fifteenth century masons marks had become very depicting masons marks had become very elaborate and many clearly show influence of older Irish traditions  like the use of knotwork and interlace.  Some are very fifteenth century Irish masons marks are very elaborate and its hard to tell if they are decoration or masons marks.  South  Tipperary has many fine examples of masons marks from this period for  examples Holycross Abbey, Cahir Priory, Kilcooley Abbey and the parish church in Cahir and Molough Abbey. […]

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